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MerrikCale
Senior Scribe

USA
947 Posts

Posted - 18 Sep 2006 :  02:15:08  Show Profile  Visit MerrikCale's Homepage Send MerrikCale a Private Message  Reply with Quote  Delete Topic
If you are a big forgotten realms novel fan, what non-FR novels would you recommend and why?



When hinges creak in doorless chambers and strange and frightening sounds echo through the halls, whenever candlelights flicker where the air is deathly still, that is the time when ghosts are present, practicing their terror with ghoulish delight.

Archwizard
Learned Scribe

USA
266 Posts

Posted - 18 Sep 2006 :  02:41:45  Show Profile  Visit Archwizard's Homepage Send Archwizard a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I would recommend Dune by Frank Herbert and the rest of that series written by him. I haven't read the prequels written by his son, so I can't comment on those. Whenever anyone asks for book recommendations I usually blurt out Dune anyway, but in regards to the Realms, I think Dune is a good non-Realms depiction of people possessing awesome personal abilities and massive political/military might. I think Dune is an excellent example of how to interpret the epic NPCs of the Realms. These characters have near omnipotent power and prestige, yet they can't do or know everything, not for certain anyway. Several of the characters can see multiple futures, but to commit to one vision does not mean things are set in stone. This reminds me of Ed's replies here, speaking about indefinite and malleable fate in the Realms. The sidebar in the 3e FRCS, The Concerns of the Mighty also reminded me of the Dune series.

I think Dune is one of the better depiction of immensely powerful characters, so much so that I have yet to read or hear about a Realms novel address something similar to such depth. In addition to the study of the savior archetype, I found the Dune series to be an interesting and fun read in general. It's not exactly traditional fantasy, but some aspects of it come close.

Edited by - Archwizard on 18 Sep 2006 06:22:56
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Conlon
Learned Scribe

Canada
132 Posts

Posted - 18 Sep 2006 :  04:29:48  Show Profile  Visit Conlon's Homepage Send Conlon a Private Message  Reply with Quote
George R.R. Martin's "A Song of Ice and Fire".

This is the best fantasy fiction I have ever read. Gritty realism and believable characters set in a volatile political theatre. Intense battles, betrayals, glorious victories and heartbreaking defeats - this series has them all. Simply a must-read for any fantasy reading enthusiast. I can't recommend it enough.

For a lighter read, I enjoyed the Dragonlance Chronicles and Legends.

My hopes are ashes, my dreams are dust. All my intentions mean nothing unless they are followed by action.
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The Hooded One
Lady Herald of Realmslore

5056 Posts

Posted - 18 Sep 2006 :  04:47:27  Show Profile  Visit The Hooded One's Homepage Send The Hooded One a Private Message  Reply with Quote
A SONG FOR ARBONNE and TIGANA by Guy Gavriel Kay.
THE FACE IN THE FROST by John Bellairs.
The first five Amber novels by Roger Zelazny.
THE DREAM-QUEST OF UNKNOWN KADATH by H.P. Lovecraft.
several of Lord Dunsany's short stories ("The Sword of Welleran" in particular), ditto Fritz Leiber's Fafhrd & Grey Mouser tales (such as the first one where Fafhrd leaves home, and "Thieves' House"), and Jack Vance's Dying Earth tales.
And so on (and on!); I can list dozens if you want, but have here tried to cleave to books I know Ed, as creator of the Realms, loves.
THO
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KnightErrantJR
Great Reader

USA
5402 Posts

Posted - 18 Sep 2006 :  05:08:51  Show Profile  Visit KnightErrantJR's Homepage Send KnightErrantJR a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I dearly love the Fafhrd and Mouser books, and can't recommend them enough to anyone that might be interested in fantasy fiction, especially by way of D&D. There is a LOT in those books that you can see had a direct hand in shaping some of the conventions of the game, and even barring that they are just amazingly imaginative fantasy stories.
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Richard Lee Byers
Forgotten Realms Author

USA
1814 Posts

Posted - 18 Sep 2006 :  05:48:28  Show Profile  Visit Richard Lee Byers's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Like KnightErrantJR, I enthusiastically recommend the Gray Mouser and Fafhrd books by Fritz Leiber, my all-time favorite sword-and-sorcery series.
I also recommend the following works of heroic fantasy:
The Conan, Kull, Bran Mak Morn, and Solomon Kane stories of Robert E. Howard
The Gods of Pegana, and Lord Dunsany's other books set in the same universe
The Dying Earth books by Jack Vance
The Broken Sword, and Three Hearts and Three Lions, by Poul Anderson
The Incomplete Enchanter and its sequels by L. Sprague de Camp and Fletcher Pratt
The Kane series by Karl Edward Wagner
The Jirel of Joiry stories by C. L. Moore
The Hobbit, and The Lord of the Rings, by J. R, R. Tolkien
The above are all older works, and in some cases, highly influential in shaping the genre. When it comes to writers who are still contributing to the field, I agree with Conlon that George R. R. Martin's epic is something special. I'm also a big fan of Tad Williams (author of the trilogy Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn, the stand-alone book The War of the Flowers, and Shadowmarch, among other works), and Greg Keyes's sequence that begins with The Briar King.
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Erik Scott de Bie
Forgotten Realms Author

USA
4598 Posts

Posted - 18 Sep 2006 :  06:20:46  Show Profile  Visit Erik Scott de Bie's Homepage Send Erik Scott de Bie a Private Message  Reply with Quote
These are in no particular order.

David Gemmell's Rigante series, starting with "Sword in the Storm." Heroic Sword and Sorcery on an epic scale that never loses touch with the personal. Also "Legend" by Gemmell and its following series.

Ditto George R.R. Martin's aSoIaF; a fantasy epic about the movers and shakers of his medieval-Europe-style world (based on the War of the Roses, though somewhat loosely); then, when most of them have died off, it becomes about the littler people. Incredibly gripping and addictive -- even if he makes you so angry you throw the book across the room (and he will), you'll come crawling back, because Martin will have become your master. He's written other stuff as well, but I haven't yet read it myself.

Steven Erikson's Malazan series, starting with "Gardens of the Moon." Often compared to Martin, fantasy epic focusing on the less powerful/less important (in terms of royalty). I haven't read much of his stuff myself, so I can't say too much about it, but he gets nothing but good press.

Jacqueline Carey's Kusheline trilogy, starting with "Kushiel's Dart." Erotic fantasy that doesn't lose touch with its sword & sorcery / epic roots. Very gripping, engaging reads, though clearly not for the under 15 crowd.

R.A. Salvatore's DemonWars saga, starting with "The Demon Awakens." Gripping, epic-scale (focusing on the personal), set in his own world (Corona) that still maintains the keen eye for battle, characterization is the focus. Seven books. Book three may make you want to stop; don't.

If you're willing to look into fantasy in the modern day, Neil Gaiman's "American Gods" (a serious fantasy drama/thriller about what happens to the old gods as the centuries wear on) and "Anansi Boys" (a not-so-serious comedy, also about gods in the modern world). Also "Good Omens" -- co-written with Terry Pratchett -- about the comedy of the apocalypse.

In fact, anything by Gaiman or Pratchett.

Second the Hooded One's excellent Lovecraft suggestion ("Dream Quest of Unknown Kadath") -- add anything else by Lovecraft. If you have horror leanings, he's awesome; Poe plus magic/fantasy. If you want to know anything about the awesome Cthulu, he's the go-to guy.

Last but certainly, certainly not least, Robert Howard's tragically limited writings (he left us before he'd reached the fullness of his talent) about his modest little creation called Conan the Barbarian. If you want to see some of the birthing of modern Sword and Sorcery, there you go.

Cheers

Erik Scott de Bie

'Tis easier to destroy than to create.

Author of a number of Realms novels (GHOSTWALKER, DEPTHS OF MADNESS, and the SHADOWBANE series), contributor to the NEVERWINTER CAMPAIGN GUIDE and SHADOWFELL: GLOOMWROUGHT AND BEYOND, Twitch DM of the Dungeon Scrawlers, currently playing "The Westgate Irregulars"
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Wooly Rupert
Master of Mischief
Moderator

USA
36787 Posts

Posted - 18 Sep 2006 :  06:42:58  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Erik Scott de Bie

If you're willing to look into fantasy in the modern day, Neil Gaiman's "American Gods" (a serious fantasy drama/thriller about what happens to the old gods as the centuries wear on) and "Anansi Boys" (a not-so-serious comedy, also about gods in the modern world). Also "Good Omens" -- co-written with Terry Pratchett -- about the comedy of the apocalypse.



I can second all of these books. American Gods was kind of an odd, but enjoyable ride. I loved Anansi Boys, and Good Omens is one of my all-time favorite books, ever.

I will also second the Lord of the Rings books, and the Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser tales.

Other personal faves of mine:

Any of the Riftwar-related books by Raymond E Feist (including the Empire trilogy, cowritten with Janny Wurts, which features some incredible political maneuvering).

Anything by Margaret Weis & Tracy Hickman (yes, that includes their non-DL stuff like the Death's Gate Cycle, the four Darksword novels, and the Rose of the Prophet trilogy).

I'm very much enjoying the Dresden Files by Jim Butcher, right now, and I can't wait for the show to start. I heartily recommend this series; it's a mix of detective drama and urban fantasy, with a liberal splash of humor to liven the mix.

And, Lurue help me, I enjoyed the Harry Potter books, too.

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The Sage
Procrastinator Most High

Australia
31701 Posts

Posted - 18 Sep 2006 :  07:16:46  Show Profile Send The Sage a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Wooly Rupert

quote:
Originally posted by Erik Scott de Bie

If you're willing to look into fantasy in the modern day, Neil Gaiman's "American Gods" (a serious fantasy drama/thriller about what happens to the old gods as the centuries wear on) and "Anansi Boys" (a not-so-serious comedy, also about gods in the modern world). Also "Good Omens" -- co-written with Terry Pratchett -- about the comedy of the apocalypse.



I can second all of these books. American Gods was kind of an odd, but enjoyable ride. I loved Anansi Boys, and Good Omens is one of my all-time favorite books, ever.
I third these suggestions. Great books all. I'll also add Gaiman's Stardust and Smoke & Mirrors. As well, if you can find the graphic novels, Gaiman's The Sandman.

quote:
I will also second the Lord of the Rings books
Agreed on the LotR, and I'm including The Silmarillion and Unfinished Tales here as well.

quote:
Other personal faves of mine:

Any of the Riftwar-related books by Raymond E Feist (including the Empire trilogy, cowritten with Janny Wurts, which features some incredible political maneuvering).
Seconded.

quote:
Anything by Margaret Weis & Tracy Hickman (yes, that includes their non-DL stuff like the Death's Gate Cycle, the four Darksword novels, and the Rose of the Prophet trilogy).
Again, I agree.

I'll also throw Margaret's Dragonvarld trilogy into the mix and Hickman's Bronze Canticles.

quote:
I'm very much enjoying the Dresden Files by Jim Butcher, right now, and I can't wait for the show to start. I heartily recommend this series; it's a mix of detective drama and urban fantasy, with a liberal splash of humor to liven the mix.
Wooly's definitely on the mark here. Ever since Elaine mentioned them a few months ago, I haven't been able to put these books down.

Now, a few of my own personal suggestions...

Anything by China Miéville -- with his recent anthology Looking for Jake being a wonderful selection of his various writing skills.

All of Terry Pratchett's works. Truly a masterful series that is both entertaining and thought-provoking.

Ed's Band of Four novels. While not the Realms, they're certaily a fine display of Ed's superb world-creation powers at work.

James Luceno's SW novels. Labyrinth of Evil and Dark Lord: The Rise of Darth Vader were, quite simply, awesome.

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Dargoth
Great Reader

Australia
4607 Posts

Posted - 18 Sep 2006 :  07:52:55  Show Profile  Visit Dargoth's Homepage Send Dargoth a Private Message  Reply with Quote
The Warlord chronicles and the Grail quest series by Bernard Cornwell

“I am the King of Rome, and above grammar”

Emperor Sigismund

"Its good to be the King!"

Mel Brooks
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Jorkens
Great Reader

Norway
2950 Posts

Posted - 18 Sep 2006 :  08:18:18  Show Profile Send Jorkens a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Richard Lee Byers

Like KnightErrantJR, I enthusiastically recommend the Gray Mouser and Fafhrd books by Fritz Leiber, my all-time favorite sword-and-sorcery series.
I also recommend the following works of heroic fantasy:
The Conan, Kull, Bran Mak Morn, and Solomon Kane stories of Robert E. Howard
The Gods of Pegana, and Lord Dunsany's other books set in the same universe
The Dying Earth books by Jack Vance
The Broken Sword, and Three Hearts and Three Lions, by Poul Anderson
The Incomplete Enchanter and its sequels by L. Sprague de Camp and Fletcher Pratt
The Kane series by Karl Edward Wagner
The Jirel of Joiry stories by C. L. Moore
The Hobbit, and The Lord of the Rings, by J. R, R. Tolkien


Well, it seems Richard said almost everything on my favorite list and The Hooded one has mentioned Zelazny; I can only ad a few essentials of the genre.

Stephen R Donaldson: Thomas Covenant books.
Mervyn Peake: the Ghormengast trilogy.
Michael Moorcock; most people prefer the Elric books, but theres more than enough to choose from.
E.R. Eddison: The Worm of Ouroboros, The mistress of mistresses.

PS; I mention these more as great and essential works in fantasy literature, than as books bearing any great likeness with Realms literature.
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The Red Walker
Great Reader

USA
3563 Posts

Posted - 18 Sep 2006 :  12:42:35  Show Profile Send The Red Walker a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I like to start back at the beggining so try these:

The Illiad and The Oddysey by Homer.
I got the Dramatic readings of these on tape to listen to on a trip. Then read them later.

These were written in a time were most everything that takes place in "Our Realms", would have been beleived to have been possible, if not fact. This lends a feeling of realism that most cannot match. You just get a real feel that you are reading history, not fiction!

Edit:

How could I have forgot: "The Epic of Gilgamesh"!


Also, I cannot forget : Dragonlance's Chronicles and Legends Trilogies. Good solid tales with several GREAT characters.

Chronicles of Narnia, especially if you have children, it was a great experience to share with my 10 year old daughter. A good starting point for anyone to east into fantasy.

A little nonsense now and then, relished by the wisest men - Willy Wonka

"We need men who can dream of things that never were." -

John F. Kennedy, speech in Dublin, Ireland, June 28, 1963

Edited by - The Red Walker on 18 Sep 2006 12:49:56
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Mace Hammerhand
Great Reader

Germany
2296 Posts

Posted - 18 Sep 2006 :  12:53:08  Show Profile  Visit Mace Hammerhand's Homepage Send Mace Hammerhand a Private Message  Reply with Quote
The question is, are you looking for fantasy fiction or fiction in general? Since I read a bit of everything here are my suggestions:

Atlantis Found, Clive Cussler; a FUN book, very good entertainment.
Gideon and Icarus, Russell Andrews; great thrillers, fun to read.
A Place of Execution, Val McDiarmid; amazing, frightening, and scary thriller.
Fox on the Rhine, Michael Dobson & Douglas Niles; stunning and believable alternate history
Fatherland, can't-recall-the-name; damn good alternate history thriller
Coldheart Canyon, Clive Barker; Hollywood at its weirdest, 'nuff said.
I, Jedi, Michael Stackpole; best Star Wars novel I've ever read.
Good Omens, Neil Gaiman & Terry Pratchett; I laughed until I cried, it can hardly get better.
Discworld series, Terry Pratchett; great comedy, you usually can tell by the sporadic bursts of laughter people let forth in a public place that they are reading Pratchett.
Memory, Thorn and Sorrow, Tad Williams; fantasy at its best (I haven't read GRRM yet).
The Illiad and The Odyssey, Homer; a MUST!


These are the ones I'd suggest to anyone, whether they like'em or not, is not my business.

Cheers

Mace's not so gentle gamer's journal My rants were harmless compared to this, beware!
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Richard Lee Byers
Forgotten Realms Author

USA
1814 Posts

Posted - 18 Sep 2006 :  13:38:02  Show Profile  Visit Richard Lee Byers's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I restricted my previous recommendations to heroic fantasy, but I share Dargoth's enthusiasm for Bernard Cornwell. I don't think anyone has ever written better historical adventure stories.
Even restricting myself to swords-and-castles-style fantasy, I forgot to mention:
The stories of Clark Ashton Smith (especially the Zothique tales, which have been collected in a book of that name.)
The "Flat Earth" novels, Kill the Dead, The Storm Lord, and many other works by Tanith Lee
The Eric John Stark novels by Leigh Brackett. Technically, I guess these class as science fantasy in the vein of Burroughs's Mars novels rather than true sword-and-sorcery, but they read exactly like heroic fantasy. Some of the titles are: The Secret of Sinharat, People of the Talisman, The Ginger Star, and The Hounds of Skaith.
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Dargoth
Great Reader

Australia
4607 Posts

Posted - 18 Sep 2006 :  13:51:12  Show Profile  Visit Dargoth's Homepage Send Dargoth a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Stepping outside the Fantasy area Id also recommend the Star Wars novels by Timothy Zahn (I personally view Heir to the Empire, Dark Force Rising and the Last Command to be the VII, VIII and IX chapters of the Star Wars saga)

Outside of the FR novels and D&D stuff I currently have the following set aside in my Amazon account

Path of Destruction: A Novel of the Old Republic (Darth Bane)by Drew Karpyshyn (Who wrote the FR novel Temple Hill)

Allegience a Star Wars novels by Timothy Zahn

“I am the King of Rome, and above grammar”

Emperor Sigismund

"Its good to be the King!"

Mel Brooks
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Steven Schend
Forgotten Realms Designer & Author

USA
1707 Posts

Posted - 18 Sep 2006 :  15:56:05  Show Profile  Visit Steven Schend's Homepage Send Steven Schend a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Darned near anything by Neil Gaiman (especially Stardust and SANDMAN); I'd also recommend Alan Moore, Warren Ellis, or Grant Morrison as great comics writers, but there's few hooks for FR fans.

Charles de Lint's TRADER, FORESTS OF THE HEART, or nearly any Newford material.

Robert E. Howard--anything, though I prefer Kull or Conan over Kane, and have yet to try Bran Mak Morn.

L. Frank Baum's OZ books, preferrably the first four and TIK-TOK OF OZ

Nina Kiriki Hoffman's THREAD THAT BINDS THE BONES, which I'm currently rereading, has a lot of nice touches that "feel" like the Realms, even though it's contemporary fantasy. And I love nearly anything she writes, so hunt up anything.

I'm sure I could think of more...but I've only had 1.6 hours of sleep in 3 days.....so I'm outta here.

For current projects and general natter, see www.steveneschend.com
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Mace Hammerhand
Great Reader

Germany
2296 Posts

Posted - 18 Sep 2006 :  16:06:12  Show Profile  Visit Mace Hammerhand's Homepage Send Mace Hammerhand a Private Message  Reply with Quote
In terms of decade long continuity, and something I haven't read in about 20 years, check out Perry Rhodan. Provided you can find it translated from German. The Perry-team has managed since 1961 to maintain and develop a sci fi world that is unequaled by anyone. One 60 pages "pulp" book per week for 45 years, each and every issue coordinated to fit into the larger scale of the universe. In addition to that you have spinoff series and paperbacks.

It's sad that Perry never really became as popular in non-German-speaking countries as it is in Germany. Plus every company who runs a continuous world, like the Realms, should take a peak at how the Perry editors do their thing.

Mace's not so gentle gamer's journal My rants were harmless compared to this, beware!
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Jorkens
Great Reader

Norway
2950 Posts

Posted - 18 Sep 2006 :  17:28:41  Show Profile Send Jorkens a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Once again Richard has mentioned those writers I forgot.

As this is turning into a "Fantasy masterworks" I will add:

Ann McCaffrey's Pern series.
Ursula Le Guin's Earthsea series
Evangeline Walton: Mabinogi adaptions.
Andre Norton; Noumerous great books, interesting trivia: Quag Keep was the first D&D based book written.
Patricia McKillip: Ridlemaster books and The Forgotten Beast of Eld.
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Wooly Rupert
Master of Mischief
Moderator

USA
36787 Posts

Posted - 18 Sep 2006 :  17:34:44  Show Profile Send Wooly Rupert a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Dargoth

Stepping outside the Fantasy area Id also recommend the Star Wars novels by Timothy Zahn (I personally view Heir to the Empire, Dark Force Rising and the Last Command to be the VII, VIII and IX chapters of the Star Wars saga)


I'll echo this statement. I've only read a double-handful of Star Wars novels, and all but one of them was by Timothy Zahn. He does an excellent job capturing the feel of the classic trilogy.

The only other Star Wars novel I've read was mentioned by Mace: I, Jedi. Due to his BattleTech writing, I'm very much a fan of Michael Stackpole. That's why I picked up this book, which is definitely in my top 100.

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Kajehase
Great Reader

Sweden
2104 Posts

Posted - 18 Sep 2006 :  17:59:41  Show Profile Send Kajehase a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Most of my reccomendations have been covered already, but I'd like to add A Song for Arbonne by Guy Gavriel Kay (why just Tigana, oh Hooded One?), and anything by Robin Hobb or the woman who became contributing editor to Dragon Magazine at roughly the same time as Ed - Katherine Kerr.

As for non-fantasy I'm currently reading This thing of darkness by Harry Thompson which I cant praise enough.

Mod edit: Fixed a bit of incorrect coding.

There is a rumour going around that I have found god. I think is unlikely because I have enough difficulty finding my keys, and there is empirical evidence that they exist.
Terry Pratchett

Edited by - Wooly Rupert on 18 Sep 2006 20:15:08
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quajack
Seeker

86 Posts

Posted - 18 Sep 2006 :  18:09:12  Show Profile  Visit quajack's Homepage Send quajack a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Robert Jordan's Wheel of time books are good, but at the rate the novels are published, the author may never finish the series.
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Mace Hammerhand
Great Reader

Germany
2296 Posts

Posted - 18 Sep 2006 :  20:30:31  Show Profile  Visit Mace Hammerhand's Homepage Send Mace Hammerhand a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by quajack

Robert Jordan's Wheel of time books are good, but at the rate the novels are published, the author may never finish the series.



Never got through the first book entirely... too much blah about nothing, IMHO

Mace's not so gentle gamer's journal My rants were harmless compared to this, beware!
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Reefy
Senior Scribe

United Kingdom
892 Posts

Posted - 19 Sep 2006 :  01:09:49  Show Profile  Visit Reefy's Homepage Send Reefy a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I don't think anybody's mentioned Philip Pullman yet, so I feel I should. I really enjoyed both the His Dark Materials and the Sally Lockhart series.

Life is either daring adventure or nothing.
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The Sage
Procrastinator Most High

Australia
31701 Posts

Posted - 19 Sep 2006 :  01:28:07  Show Profile Send The Sage a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Ooooh! His Dark Materials. Excellent choice Reefy.

'Tis a wonderful additional reference source for any PLANESCAPE campaign.

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EvilKnight
Learned Scribe

USA
162 Posts

Posted - 19 Sep 2006 :  01:36:16  Show Profile  Visit EvilKnight's Homepage Send EvilKnight a Private Message  Reply with Quote
If you want some older ones that are easy to get for just a few coin:
1. Alexandre Dumas books (Count of Monte Cristo, Three Musketeers' books, Queen Margot, etc).
2. The Scarlet Pimpernel by Baroness Orczy
3. Scaramouche by Rafael Sabatini

EvilKnight

Danali Index
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Conlon
Learned Scribe

Canada
132 Posts

Posted - 19 Sep 2006 :  02:37:50  Show Profile  Visit Conlon's Homepage Send Conlon a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by quajack

Robert Jordan's Wheel of time books are good, but at the rate the novels are published, the author may never finish the series.



I was going to mention this series as well, but unfortunately, I've become somewhat frustrated with the pace and continuing convolution of it.

I do have faith that the esteemed Mr. Jordan will sort this out, but I would hesitate to recommend it until he has done so.

I also must echo the praise for Tad Williams. I much enjoyed his Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn series, as well as his other, less "fantasy" books.

My hopes are ashes, my dreams are dust. All my intentions mean nothing unless they are followed by action.

Edited by - Conlon on 19 Sep 2006 02:39:35
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Richard Lee Byers
Forgotten Realms Author

USA
1814 Posts

Posted - 19 Sep 2006 :  12:44:09  Show Profile  Visit Richard Lee Byers's Homepage  Reply with Quote
EvilKnight (and anyone else who likes Dumas, Sabatini, and Orczy): Have you checked out the novels Captain Alatriste and Purity of Blood by Arturo Perez-Reverte? If not, I think you'd probably like them.
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Bladedancer
Learned Scribe

USA
149 Posts

Posted - 19 Sep 2006 :  12:54:52  Show Profile  Visit Bladedancer's Homepage Send Bladedancer a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I just recently reaquainted myself with Melanie Rawn's books including the Dragon Prince Trilogy and the Dragon Star trilogy. Good books I think although they can get a bit slow sometimes. The whole Sunrunner way of magic just facinates me for some reason.

Solarr Bladedancer
Mercenary For Hire
Master of the Ginsu Knives
They Slice They Dice They Will Cut through A Tin Can
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Alisttair
Great Reader

Canada
3054 Posts

Posted - 19 Sep 2006 :  13:51:58  Show Profile  Visit Alisttair's Homepage Send Alisttair a Private Message  Reply with Quote
RA Salvatore non FR novels and Tolkien

Karsite Arcanar (Most Holy Servant of Karsus)

Anauria - Survivor State of Netheril as penned by me:
http://www.dmsguild.com/m/product/172023
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thekosta
Acolyte

USA
8 Posts

Posted - 19 Sep 2006 :  18:27:49  Show Profile  Visit thekosta's Homepage Send thekosta a Private Message  Reply with Quote
A couple that I'd like to throw out there that I like is

Terry Goodkind The sword of truth series

Kate Elliot The crown of stars series
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GothicDan
Master of Realmslore

USA
1103 Posts

Posted - 20 Sep 2006 :  02:42:09  Show Profile  Visit GothicDan's Homepage Send GothicDan a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Well, let's try to remember that the original post was about non-FR novels for an FR-fan.

Specifically, Merrik, which FR novels do you like in particular? Knowing the sort of FR novels you like (and, even with a single genre, they run the gamut) will help us to specify which books to reccommend. :)

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"Fiends and Undead are the peanut butter and jelly of evil." - Me
"That attitude should be stomped on, whenever and wherever it's encountered, because it makes people holding such views bad citizens, not just bad roleplayers (considering D&D was structured as a 'forced cooperation' game, and although successive editions are pointing it more and more towards a me-first, min-max game, the drift away from 'we all need each other to succeed' will at some point make it 'no longer' D&D)." - ED GREENWOOD
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